Working for Title IX

Linda Barker in Vero Beach would like to know what other branches are doing to support Title IX. She wrote to national and received the following reply from Olivia Guerrieri (who gave me permission to post):

Meeting with your district’s Title IX Coordinators is a great first step! Successful advocacy is all about relationships, and having a meeting is the first step to starting one. We hope you’ll continue to develop relationships with the Title IX Coordinators you’ve spoken to, and if there are any you haven’t reached out to yet, you can find their information here. One next step you can take in building these relationships is to co-author a letter to the editor about the importance of upholding Title IX protections. You can read more about this idea here, and view a customizable sample letter here. When meeting with Title IX Coordinators, we also encourage you to ask what support your local Title IX Coordinator needs from the community. Finding out what would be most helpful for them will help you use your advocacy power most effectively.
 
Regarding principals serving as Title IX Coordinators, the Department of Education’s 2015 Dear Colleague Letter says, “Title IX does not categorically exclude particular employees from serving as Title IX coordinators. However, when designating a Title IX coordinator, a recipient should be careful to avoid designating an employee whose other job responsibilities may create a conflict of interest. For example, designating a disciplinary board member, general counsel, dean of students, superintendent, principal, or athletics director as the Title IX coordinator may pose a conflict of interest.” This letter is part of the resources you helpfully put in the hands of your local school district. You might consider following up to ask if they have any questions about the information.
 
There are a few other next steps your branch may want to consider moving forward. Many branches have held great community events or forums where they’ve asked local Title IX Coordinators, from all levels of education, to speak about their roles—another way to develop those relationships, while also sharing information with others in your community. One possible discussion topic would be the Civil Rights Data Collection, in which 67 percent of local education agencies reported zero allegations of sexual harassment or bullying during the 2013–14 school year—obviously not an accurate reflection. 
 
AAUW branches have also worked to advance legislation in their states that would address the issue of campus sexual assault. 

Author: Pat DeWitt

I am a retired institutional researcher, a musician and musicologist, and support AAUW as well as several environmental causes.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s